In the News

People often ask me, “But haven’t you ever come across a real case of ritual abuse?”. The answer is yes, I have. And I can tell you this: Almost without exception, that ritual abuse has involved small Christian cults, rather than international Satanic ones. For example, the Hosanna Church cult in Ponchatoula, Louisiana, was originally branded a Satanic cult that ritually abused children, but victims who testified at the trial of pastor Louis Lamonica Jr. mentioned only ritual abuse committed in a Christian context.
Now we have even graver allegations being made against a young Bible study leader in Kansas City, Missouri. Micah Moore, 22, has been charged with the murder of nurse Bethany Deaton, 27, and claims that he was persuaded to kill her by Bethany’s own husband, Tyler Deaton. Tyler is an “ex-gay” who has headed a small, tight-knit Christian group for the past several years. Some members are so devoted to Tyler that they followed him from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, to his current home in Kansas City. Tyler and Bethany had been married for just three months when she died. Bethany’s death on October 30 initially appeared to be a suicide (her body was found in a van parked near Longview Lake, a plastic bag over her head). No one suspected otherwise until Moore turned himself in earlier this month. He told police that Tyler has been engaging in “spiritual sex” with several of the young men who share his house, and that he routinely drugged Bethany so that his followers could rape her. Moore even claimed to possess video footage of these sexual assaults. Fearful that Bethany would tell her therapist about what was going on, Tyler approached Micah with the idea of murdering her and disguising her death as a suicide.
At this early stage, it’s possible that Moore’s story will turn out to be false. Maybe he killed his leader’s wife on his own and pinned the blame on Tyler. However, at least three of the Deatons’ four roommates have confirmed that Tyler was having sex with them and that he termed these relations “spiritual”. The fourth roommate feels he was being groomed to become one of Tyler’s sexual partners.
In Texas, Tyler felt that the official student clubs at Southwestern University weren’t hardcore enough for him, so he formed his own independent group. Members would spend hours of every day in the campus chapel, praying and singing under Tyler’s direction. They also engaged in “holy laughter”, and attempted faith healing of severely disabled people on at least two occasions. Tyler preached to his group about the evils of homosexuality, claiming he “overcame” his own gay orientation through the power of Christ. By the end of the 2008-2009 school year, Southwestern administrators were so troubled by the group’s activities that they denied Deaton further use of the chapel. That’s when Tyler, Bethany, and several young men decided to relocate to a more sympathetic school, the International House of Prayer University in Kansas City. In Missouri, Bethany and Tyler attended Forerunner Christian Fellowship Church. They married in August of this year.
If the allegations made by Micah Moore are true, then a murderous Christian sex cult has been active on the campus of a Christian university for the past three years, engaging in ritualistic sex and rape under the direction of a charismatic but deranged leader. Will we call this group’s practices “Christian ritual abuse”? Or will we continue to insist that abusive sexual practices are the exclusive domain of Satanists, when all evidence indicates that Satanic crime is, in fact, far less common than Christian crime? When you think about it, this makes sense. There are far fewer Satanists in America than Christians, so the rate of crimes committed by Christians should be much higher than the rate of crimes committed by Satanists. This includes sexual abuse and murder.Another Forerunner was in the news this week, when 19-year-old Two and a Half Men star Angus T. Jones declared in a video produced by The Forerunner Chronicles that he feels terrible about being on a show that is “filth” and might even be contributing to Satan’s plan to subvert humanity. He urged Americans to avoid television altogether, in fact. He has since qualified his remarks, stating that he has a lot of respect for everyone who works on the show; he considers them members of his family. He has not attempted to explain how a program produced by such good people can be a tool of the Devil.
The man who appears beside Jones in the video is Christopher “Forerunner” Hudson, a YouTuber who believes that Jay-Z is a Satan-worshiping Freemason. Hudson also buys into and promotes a broad range of conspiracy nonsense: The death of Osama bin Laden was faked, Michael Jackson’s death was engineered to distract the world from the Pope’s plea for a New World Order, etc.

Charisma magazine is the most popular Christian magazine in the world. Despite its conservative slant, the articles featured in it are usually timely and concisely written, with little of the bombast you’ll see on TV programs like The 700 Club or Jack Van Impe Presents. What, then, shall we make of a recent article titled “Can You Be Raped by the Devil?“, which claims that the Medieval notion of succubi and incubi invading our bedrooms at night is valid, and that the content of our dreams can be influenced by these demons? The article, which relies heavily on the anecdotal accounts of one former stripper, even suggests that sexual orientation can be altered by sexual demons. Does ancient superstition such as this really belong in the world’s foremost Christian publication, read by millions? What is this teaching the younger readers of the magazine – that every wet dream they experience in adolescence is actually a visitation from a demon bent on making them gay?

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One response to “In the News”

  1. Highland Host says :

    I am very much afraid that 'Charisma' magazine, in common with far too many charismatic Christians, is somewhat gullible where supernatural claims are concerned. As a pastor with a science degree from Liverpool University earned in a Church of England college (now a university), I understand such a reaction against antisupernaturalism, but it is tragically mistaken. Over the years I have seen time and again such claims made, with no real evidence at all. It looks foolish because it is foolish. To see demons everywhere is not a sign of spirituality, but of stupidity, or at least gullibility.

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